How to Save Money on Contact Lenses

Replacemycontacts/ June 10, 2014/ Uncategorized/

Have you ever planned your meals for the week based on what’s on sale at the grocery store? Do you use drugstore points and reward systems to save on your preferred bottle of aspirin or heartburn remedy? Shopping for the best price on contact lenses is no different, and typically employs some of the same search strategies.

Below are 10 helpful tips to follow that will save you money on your next contact lens purchase.


1.      Buy Contact Lenses Online

Comparing prices on your contact lenses is a game plan most easily accomplished online. Prices are often lower on the web, as online retailers can eliminate the overhead costs of a physical space, as well as the middleman who supplies the product, from the final consumer price. This means that you can often purchase contact lenses online for cheaper than they would be sold in-store – just make sure you purchase the correct lenses based on your prescription. If you buy the wrong contact lens brand or size, you will wind up jeopardizing your eyes’ health and spending more money in the long run.    Beautiful young woman shopping over internet

2.      Take advantage of Online Coupons 

It’s easy to search for savings from different online retailers, once you know the brand and type of contact lenses required for your specific prescription. Replace My Contacts carries products by dozens of popular brands, such as Acuvue, FreshLook, Dailies and Biofinity that are already marked down at a discount. However, you can find coupons to save you extra from websites such as Coupon Mountain, Coupon Cabin and Retail Me Not.

3.      Calculate a Complete Cost Total

Before you purchase your contact lenses, do a complete calculation of all costs. Calculate your total cost, not just cost per box
The cost per box advertised by contact lens sites and the majority of shopping sites can be very misleading
. It does not take into account four other factors which make a significant difference in the total amount you pay. These factors are:
• Shipping cost: the cost of shipping the product to you
• Handling cost: the cost of processing your order
• Volume discounts: the discount you receive for buying a larger quantity (only available on some sites)
• Coupons/promotional discounts: seasonal, shipping or product-specific discounts
To find the lowest total price, you must take all four of these factors into account.
For example, advertises Focus Monthly for $17.99 per box, however, if you order a year’s supply you will actually pay $21.15 per box.
Simply judging the price by the box can end up being misleading, especially with numerous refills required throughout the year.

  •  What are the shipping and handling costs of sending the product to you?
  • What promo codes or coupons will the online site accept?
  •  Beware of yearly supply offers.  Doing the simple math of adding up all the costs and dividing by 12 may reflect a cost per box that is higher than if you were to purchase them all separately.Clean-a-Contact-Lens-Case-Step-5


4.      Look For Yearly Supply Offers

We just told you to beware of offers for a yearly supply of contacts, but that doesn’t mean the offer isn’t worth considering.  Just as grocery stores offer better prices on bulk items, contact lens online retailers also offer some great deals when you purchase a year’s supply. Take into consideration all the fees involved in your online contact lens order, and calculate the offer to see if it’s worth the investment in the long-run.


5.      Mama Says “You Better Shop Around”

The Internet is the best place to compare websites and retail sites when shopping for contact lenses. Take your time in shopping around for the best price, but also investigate the retailer’s return policy.  No matter how great the online deal is, make sure that a fair return policy is offered and clearly stated on the website.

When your contacts arrive, double-check the entire order and make sure that you were sent the correct prescription and the number of boxes.


6.      Did You Use Your Insurance?

Many insurance providers afford an annual allowance to purchase eyeglasses or contact lenses, which renews on a recurring basis.  Read your policy on your own, or ask for help in understanding your policy from a customer representative of your insurance company. In some cases, people have an allowance left over at the end of the year, which can be credited towards contact lenses in the future, helping to keep costs down.


7.      Upgrade Your Favorite Brand

Are you in love with your current brand of contact lenses? That is great news!  As the contact lens industry is constantly making improvements to their product, research information online regarding newer contact lens brands from the same company. When companies release a new brand of contact lenses, they often offer discounts and lower prices. You not only save money, but you get a better-quality product!


8.      Ask For Your Prescription To Go

Regular optometrists make their money by offering glasses and contact lenses. Your eye physician must allow you to take both your contact lens prescription, and your eyeglass prescription home after your eye appointment; failure to do so is a violation of the law.  Rather than choose from a physician’s office expensive eye wear selection, own your prescriptions and shop for the best value. doctor-holding-prescription


9.      Read The Reviews

Online research is easy.  Before you purchase a contact lens brand or product you are unfamiliar with, browse the customer reviews of that website or product type. What were other peoples’ experiences with the retailer like?  Did their order arrive on time?  Did the retailer offer a fair price?


10.  Take Good Care Of Your Contact Lenses

Just like everything else in your world, taking good care of something makes it last longer. The directions on most contact lenses indicate that long-term storage of the contact lenses poses no harm. Keep your contact lenses clean with a daily hygienic routine, and store them in appropriate containers so you can get the most use out of a single pair.


Photos: 1,2,3