Contact Lenses For All Ages & Vision Needs

Many think of contact lenses as a product for mature teens and adults – and often don’t consider them as a real option for younger children or older seniors. But the truth is, contact lenses are available for all ages and provide solutions for practically all vision issues.

Often, individuals begin to wear contact in their ‘tween’ years (ages 10-12), but in fact younger children, who are mature enough to handle the responsibility, can make use of lenses to correct their vision as well. Contact lenses are a great option for mature children and teens as they can help to augment an individual’s self-esteem and overall confidence.

Contact lenses are most sought-out by college students and young professionals in the work world. This demographic lives a fast-paced life, overflowing with work obligations, activities, sports, and social interaction, so wearing reliable lenses is often a no-brainer for these individuals. And now, there are even some new, innovative lenses that are designed to address the ever-changing vision needs of mid-lifers and seniors who are dealing with the problems that arise with aging eyes.

No matter your age or vision needs, if you’re interested in contact lenses, talk to your eye doctor – there very well may be a solution out there just for you!

The Ins-and-Outs of Contact Lenses

If you have the mind of an engineer, and love breaking things down to their parts, here is a quick overview of the ins-and-outs of contact lenses. Contact lenses are essentially small, convex disks that offer optical benefits – such as improved near- or far-sightedness. They are specially created to cover the cornea (the front of the eye ball). On an interesting note, contacts don’t actually make "contact" with the surface of the cornea, they instead drape over it, and sit on a coating of tears that the eye produces naturally.

Contact lenses, which have been around for over a hundred years, are considered medical devices, and are thus overseen and regulated by the FDA. To acquire contact lenses, you first need to be examined by an eye doctor or eye care professional who is both qualified and certified to write a prescription for the proper contact lenses for you. After a visit with your eye doctor, you will learn how to properly wear and care for your lenses to preserve eye health.

Do You Follow Your Lens Replacement Schedule?

How often do you replace your contact lenses? In a recent study conducted by the American Optometric Association, they found that there are generational gaps in habits and awareness when it comes to contact lens wearers.

The survey revealed that younger generations are much more likely to follow their contact lens replacement schedule, as well as their wear and care guidelines. Whereas older generations were more lax about both. In case you’re unfamiliar, the replacement schedule is the length of time your lenses can be worn before they need to be replaced with new contacts. Depending of the type of contact you use, there are a variety of replacement schedules, from daily, to two-week, to monthly or longer, so it’s important to know what your contacts require. 

To maintain your eyes’ health, it’s vital to always follow your replacement schedule, unless otherwise directed by your eye care professional.

How often do you replace your contact lenses? In a recent study conducted by the American Optometric Association, they found that there are generational gaps in habits and awareness when it comes to contact lens wearers.

The survey revealed that younger generations are much more likely to follow their contact lens replacement schedule, as well as their wear and care guidelines. Whereas older generations were more lax about both. In case you’re unfamiliar, the replacement schedule is the length of time your lenses can be worn before they need to be replaced with new contacts. Depending of the type of contact you use, there are a variety of replacement schedules, from daily, to two-week, to monthly or longer, so it’s important to know what your contacts require. 

To maintain your eyes’ health, it’s vital to always follow your replacement schedule, unless otherwise directed by your eye care professional.